THE EFFECTS OF THE INTENSITY OF CIGARETTE USE AND ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY ON THE BLOOD LIPID PROFILE OF AN IRISH HIV PERSON

Charlie Slowey

Abstract


Abstract

Context: There are numerous studies on the effects of smoking and antiretroviral use separately on a HIV patient’s blood lipid profile, however there has never been a study conducted that measures the intensity of cigarette use combined with antiretroviral therapy on a patient’s blood lipid profile. Aims: To assess the effects of the intensity of cigarette usage and antiretroviral therapy on a patient’s blood lipid profile. Setting and Design: This cross-sectional study was carried out in a regional HIV clinic in Cork University Hospital between June 2016 and August 2016. Methods: 40 patients were interviewed in order to gather cigarette usage data and patient files were reviewed in order to gather blood lipid profile results and antiretroviral therapy data. Results: There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in the means of cholesterol (4.99 vs 5.47), high-density lipoprotein (1.22 vs 1.07), low-density lipoprotein (3.13 vs 3.03), nor triglycerides (1.54 vs 2.45) in smokers versus non-smokers. Low-density lipoprotein in mild and moderate smokers was increased compared to non-smokers. Conclusions: These results show that smoking combined with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor use has no significant change in blood lipid measurements when compared to controls.


Keywords


Lipid; cholesterol; high density lipoprotein; low density lipoprotein; triglyceride; HIV; AIDS; human immunodeficiency virus; antiretroviral; anti-retroviral; antiretroviral drug; smoking; cigarette; tobacco

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© 2017 Journal of Student Research ISSN: 2167-1907